Author: Norm King

Sous Vide: Sous-B-Q Pulled/Shredded Beef Top Round

When the top is the same as the inside This mode of preparation specifies the use of beef “top round,” aka “inside round.” Frequently and deceptively marketed as “London Broil” in the butcher’s case (there is no such cut of meat), it comes from a heavily used muscle of the hind leg and is typically quite tough. It can vary widely in appearance because of the large size of the primary muscle. A pre-cut piece of any shape or size ranging from 2 lb/1 Kg up to 7 lb/3 Kg can be prepared using this method without altering the...

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The Sous-B-Q Clubhouse Sandwich

Tripping the sandwich fantastic Here’s the line, here’s the sand What is the definition of a sous vide dish? Just having a single sous vide processed item as an ingredient is not enough to call it a sous vide recipe. If that were true, almost any sandwich coming out of the market deli would be a sous vide dish. All those meats wrapped in tight plastic have been processed and pasteurized using sous vide at some point. For that matter, sous vide does not even mean “cooked.” Sous vide means “under vacuum.” Almost everything is under vacuum these days,...

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Sous Vide Principles: Sous-B-Q Chicken Breasts “Noridashitaki”

Pick a cool and breezy chicken breast and drive to Buffalo It’s not an experiment. It’s an effort. Sous vide creates a lot of recipe interchangeability. As many sous vide recipes as exist for boneless chicken breasts (skin on or off), they can¬†really all start the same way: Preheat your sous vide bath to at least 135 F/58 C, but not greater than 140 F/60 C. Higher temperatures are safe but cause increased moisture loss. Vacuum seal your chicken breasts individually in heat rated plastic bags. Stage the pouches into the bath using racks to prevent them from coming...

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Sous Vide: Beef Tri-tip Roast–Sous-B-Q

“You can do this!” BBQ aficionados and pitmasters alike have always been tolerant of a certain amount of chewiness inherent in beef tri-tip. This shortcoming was rationalized by reminding ourselves that the aptly named cut was typically priced competitively. Using sous vide tenderization, we can now have the best of both worlds. This recipe features a stylistically economical approach to processing and serving the cut. The excellent flavor and texture of the smoky tri-tip can stand on its own. For the experienced sous vide practitioner, there is ample opportunity for more decorative up-scaling after the initial two faceted process....

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Sous Vide: Beef Tri-tip/Bottom Sirloin Steaks–A Simple Approach

Starting Blocks Originally designed for beginners, this commentary can benefit even the most experienced sous vide practitioners. While most premium cut steaks do not require tenderization, sous vide aficionados use the technology to create a uniform appearance of doneness throughout the steak and to retain moisture. When it comes to tri-tip/bottom sirloin, people have resigned themselves to a certain amount of chewiness inherent in this cut. We justify this by noting its typically competitive price point. This no nonsense, straightforward approach to processing and serving the cut demonstrates the value added tenderization characteristics of sous vide. In turn, the...

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Sous Vide Temperature, Time and Doneness

Doneness Preferences Here are some commonly accepted temperature setting guidelines: Rare: 129 F/54 C. Medium rare: 132 F/55 C. Medium: 135 F/57 C. Medium well: 140 F/60 C. Well done:  150 F/66 C. Sous Vide in Particular Sous Vide is not magic. It is among the simplest and most predictable methods of cooking. It minimizes loss of moisture, creates a uniform appearance of doneness throughout, and can be used to pasteurize food, greatly extending its shelf life. Sous vide temperature and time parameters are the essential keys to sous vide success. Seasonings in the bag? While putting seasonings in...

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