Author: Norm King

Umami rub #12 and 35

Ingredients: Hondashi soup base, 125 g. Knorr chicken bouillon, 100 g. Dried mushrooms, Costco Blend 125 g. Saffron, 3 g. Dried onions, 30 g. Fennel seed, 30 g. Oregano, 10 g. Black pepper, ground, 30 g. Dried parsley, 30 g. Powdered/dried egg white, as needed. Utilization: This rub was designed with a specific application in mind. After sous vide processing land or air dwelling proteins, pat the meat dry and place on parchment or a plate. Use a flour dredge (shaker) to sprinkle the top surface of the meat with powdered/dried egg white. Use a spray bottle to slightly...

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Sous Vide: Sous-B-Q Beef Top Sirloin Roast and Beyond

You can do this! Where to begin? For the purposes of this demonstration, we started with a well trimmed top sirloin center cut roast that weighed approximately 2 lb/1 Kg. The same recipe/method can be applied to top sirloin roasts and/or large steaks ranging in size anywhere from 1 lb/450 g to 4+ lb/2 Kg. The time/temperature parameters utilized are: Sous vide: 130 F/54 C for 8-12 hours and then cold shocked to 40 F/4 C. If you prefer your beef cooked to a greater degree of apparent doneness, refer to the guidelines outlined HERE. Pellet grill smoked from...

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Sous Vide: Post Process Seasonings and Rubs

There are a number of Facebook groups on sous vide now. Many of them are pretty good places to TALK about sous vide. This one is a good place to LEARN about sous vide. The Time of the Seasons Members of the sous vide Facebook Group have heard me explain that while putting seasonings in the bag may be safe in most cases, it is for the most part ineffective. Most members know that this is not my opinion, but rather the results of some solid scientific research as documented HERE. Even dedicated sous vide and other recipe resources are beginning to...

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Lazy Chef’s Demi-glace

Dem Bone Let’s say you have some scraps of fatty meat left over from the procedure described HERE. You can use them to make a sauce just like people in the FB Group are always complimenting me on as if it was difficult. It’s not. It takes a little while, which means you wait. Waiting is not hard. More on that later. Put a few drops of oil in large skillet and put about 2 lbs of scraps in. Turn the burner on medium heat, approximately 250 F/121 C. Brown the meat. There is a common misconception that the color of...

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Sous Vide: Top Sirloin; Culotte/Picahna

Stop the insanity No, this is not another high volume, blind ambition driven self help program designed to jump start our true potential as hard driving individualists. This is a recipe/article about how to sous vide process and then finish a particular cut of meat. There is, however, some controversy. People argue ad infinitum about what qualifies as a picahna, what it should look like, how it should be cut, how it should be cooked, how it should be served, and even whether it is tough or tender. The debate extends to its actual spelling, either picahna or picanha....

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Top Sirloin: You Don’t Have to Be a Butcher

Breaking the Spell We have gotten in the habit of letting others do for us what our most recent ancestors did for themselves. This is not news. My dad was no mechanic, but he could tune up the Oldsmobile and change the oil. When we were kids, we didn’t know what a landscaper was. Come to think of it, we didn’t know what a power mower was until I was 7 or 8. My parents didn’t butcher their own meat, but THEIR parents did, and even my dad knew how to break down a stag. Mom could pluck and...

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