Author: Norm King

Sous Vide: Beef Tri-tip Roast–Sous-B-Q

“You can do this!” BBQ aficionados and pitmasters alike have always been tolerant of a certain amount of chewiness inherent in beef tri-tip. This shortcoming was rationalized by reminding ourselves that the aptly named cut was typically priced competitively. Using sous vide tenderization, we can now have the best of both worlds. This recipe features a stylistically economical approach to processing and serving the cut. The excellent flavor and texture of the smoky tri-tip can stand on its own. For the experienced sous vide practitioner, there is ample opportunity for more decorative up-scaling after the initial two faceted process....

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Sous Vide: Beef Tri-tip/Bottom Sirloin Steaks–A Simple Approach

Starting Blocks Originally designed for beginners, this commentary can benefit even the most experienced sous vide practitioners. While most premium cut steaks do not require tenderization, sous vide aficionados use the technology to create a uniform appearance of doneness throughout the steak and to retain moisture. When it comes to tri-tip/bottom sirloin, people have resigned themselves to a certain amount of chewiness inherent in this cut. We justify this by noting its typically competitive price point. This no nonsense, straightforward approach to processing and serving the cut demonstrates the value added tenderization characteristics of sous vide. In turn, the...

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Sous Vide Temperature, Time and Doneness

Doneness Preferences Here are some commonly accepted temperature setting guidelines: Rare: 129 F/54 C. Medium rare: 132 F/55 C. Medium: 135 F/57 C. Medium well: 140 F/60 C. Well done:  150 F/66 C. Sous Vide in Particular Sous Vide is not magic. It is among the simplest and most predictable methods of cooking. It minimizes loss of moisture, creates a uniform appearance of doneness throughout, and can be used to pasteurize food, greatly extending its shelf life. Sous vide temperature and time parameters are the essential keys to sous vide success. Seasonings in the bag? While putting seasonings in...

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Sous Vide: Beef Top Sirloin Steak

Well kept secrets We have taken a special interest in beef top sirloin. The whole primal cut is often available in many of the big box stores. It is much cheaper per lb than the New Yorks, rib eyes and beef tenderloins, and you can save quite a bit of money if you  break it down yourself. Otherwise, any top sirloin steak from the butcher’s case will serve perfectly well. We explain how to easily disassemble a top sirloin in the article you don’t have to be a butcher. The cut usually weighs somewhere around 15 lbs, which is substantial but...

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Sous Vide: Celery Hearts

Why bother? There is nothing earth shaking about sous vide celery hearts, except that they work and I use them in presentations. People ask me what they are. Here it is: Au naturel. Remove the darkened root portion. This can also be done later, basically a preference in real time. Cut it down to about 5″/40 mm. Slice lengthwise. Make diagonal cuts at the tip to make a point. If you slice them thick enough, and with a little luck… You can make them stand up on edge like this. Process sous vide at 183 F/84 C X 1...

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Umami rub #12 and 35

Ingredients: Hondashi soup base, 125 g. Knorr chicken bouillon, 100 g. Dried mushrooms, Costco Blend 125 g. Saffron, 3 g. Dried onions, 30 g. Fennel seed, 30 g. Oregano, 10 g. Black pepper, ground, 30 g. Dried parsley, 30 g. Powdered/dried egg white, as needed. Utilization: This rub was designed with a specific application in mind. After sous vide processing land or air dwelling proteins, pat the meat dry and place on parchment or a plate. Use a flour dredge (shaker) to sprinkle the top surface of the meat with powdered/dried egg white. Use a spray bottle to slightly...

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