Search Results for: rub

Sous Vide: Smoked Beef Brisket/Beef Brisket-burgers

There’s certainly no shortage of recipes for beef brisket on the internet and elsewhere. For lovers of BBQ, this cut has a mystique all on its own.   Between our posts on this site and on Lipavi.com, we ourselves have at least twelve methods/commentaries: Beef brisket 129 F/54 C, Brisket 140 F/60 C , Hot smoked sv brisket, crutch proofed, The tale of two sous-b-q  briskets, 1 smoked first, 1 smoked last and a bonus, Brisket Flat, Brisket Point, Brisket; how to prepare for sous vide, Brisket sandwich, Brisket Flautas , Brisket Italian style shredded , Brisket Pastrami, and Corned Beef Brisket...

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Sous Vide: Bone-In Rib Eye, XXXL

Bury the tomahawk Hosting a sous vide FB Group provides defacto insight into sous vide enthusiasts’ interests. It’s no surprise that steaks rank among the most popular treatments. I avoid reminding people that tender cuts of beef are not the greatest beneficiaries of sous vide processing. After all, tenderization is rarely required, so conversion of collagen to gelatin is unnecessary. Most steaks are not processed with the intention of pasteurization and/or preservation. The only reason left to sous vide process a steak is to create the uniform appearance of doneness. Don’t get me wrong. That effect in itself has come to...

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Sous Vide Vegetables: Fresh Artichokes, Fresh Corn

Touts les deux Les artichauts Corn Ingredients: Artichokes, whole, fresh, at least 2 each. Corn, fresh, white, “on the cob,” at least 2 each. Butter, a stick or two. Kosher salt, as needed. Ground black pepper, as needed. Other stuff Demi-glace, as needed, optional. Frank’s Pepper Vinegar, wing sauce, Tabasco, etc., for splashing. Flour, small amounts, as needed. Eggs, 1 or 2, here or there. Bread crumbs, fine, 2 cups or thereabouts. Sweet and sour tomato emulsion Ketchup, 2 oz/60 ml. Vinegar, 1 oz/30 ml. Corn syrup, 1 oz/30 ml (or 1 Tablespoon sugar). Frank’s Pepper Vinegar, 1 Tablespoon.Vegetable...

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Sous Vide: Not all New Yorks are created equal. Neither are Rib Eyes. Enter the Beef Longissmus Muscle

What difference does it make? Meat’s tenderness depends on how much strain is put on that particular muscle during an animal’s lifetime. Steers’ shanks, tongues, and cheeks get the most work, and they are very tough. Shoulder and chest muscles carry the most weight, also very tough. On the other end of the spectrum, the tenderloin gets almost no work at all. Its only real function is to protect the kidneys from impact. There is so little collagen in the tenderloin that if you do not handle it carefully, the narrowest end will actually start to pull apart. There’s tender,...

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FAQS and the Norwood Method

Using one bath to prepare several steaks of different temps/appearance of doneness. For further reference, join us on Facebook This is called the Norwood method or principle after the first member that it dawned upon. Let’s say you’re having the in-laws over for dinner. As if that wasn’t bad enough, one of them likes their steaks well done, one of them likes them medium, and you and your significant other like them quite rare. Let’s say you have some scheduling issues as well, and you have to work today and then feed the brood tonight. Start your sous vide...

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Sous Vide: Resolving the Brochette Boondoggle, the Kabob Conundrum

Bamboo stick to your principles. Almost every ambitious home cook has impaled raw meat and vegetables on a stick in an effort to bring a little bit of gleam to a dinner party or barbecue. The solemn yet festive off-loading of the food from the otherwise useless skewer evokes primal memories of the ancient hunt and the blazing communal fire depicted in cave-man movies. Once the painstaking assembly is completed, the looming challenge is to grill these disparate ingredients in such a way that they all achieve the same degree of doneness simultaneously. The cavemen were not able to...

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