Author: Norm King

Sous Jus™ – What To Do With Those Juices

What to do with those  juices… It wasn’t so long ago that chefs just discarded the juices left in the bag after sous vide processing. This “Sous Jus™” is water based and carries the flavor of the particular protein.  The higher the heat, the longer the interval, the greater the release. At higher processing temperatures, the cloudy liquid will appear to have gray scrambled eggs scattered through it, and that’s just about right. This is because it contains albumins and myoglobin, which, if not removed, will smell and/or taste somewhat of sulfur and iron. It will also result in...

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Pork Bellies on Parade

I’ve been taking pictures of food for a long time. We always took spec shots in the hotels, so that we could hold cooks accountable for presentation — a picture right there on the station usually settled any debate about how something was supposed to look. Now that we’ve started the website, I find myself with a lot of pics, without the process documentation to show how they were done. I really didn’t anticipate needing it. I’m sifting through all those shots and figuring out how I can incorporate them into the demo model. I’m going to try to replicate some of them,...

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Sous-B-Q™, Penetration, and the Pellet Prototype

Just let me finish smoking this last one It’s no wonder that primitive populations created smoked foods. There was no way to prevent it. Until they learned to expose raw food to heat without exposing it to burning wood, smoke flavoring was unavoidable. As a result, humans developed a taste for smoked foods and never looked back. For all we know, our positive reaction to the smell of wood smoke has actually become imprinted in our DNA. For all the evolutionists out there, ancients that didn’t like the taste of smoked food stood a good chance of starving to death, and...

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Norm King Bio + Background

The Chef First Encounters Sous Vide I started working in hotel/restaurant kitchens just prior to 1970, so the use of Sous Vide was actually evolving in parallel to the procession of my own culinary odyssey.  We avoided each other, in a manner of speaking, except for fleeting encounters in the 80’s and 90’s; things like baby carrots in bags and a few culinary practical jokes; you can use your imagination.   I was totally dug into kitchen life, but SV didn’t gain much traction in the restaurant industry until these last 20 years. We didn’t have the specialized equipment, and...

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The Pinch/Poke Test | Tender To The Touch

There are a number of Facebook groups on sous vide now. Many of them are pretty good places to TALK about sous vide. This one is a good place to LEARN about sous vide. To Pinch or to Poke Sous Vide temperatures are very precise. The internal temperature of sous vide proteins predictably determines appearance of doneness–rare, medium, well done, etc. Combined with the time parameter, temperature is integral to the pasteurization process. Time in The conversion of collagen to gelatin is the difference between tough meat and tender meat. Once your preferred temperature has been established, TIME determines the eventual level...

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Sous Vide Hollandaise

I wonder if Hollandaise wasn’t created by some sadistic Chef looking for yet another way to torment apprentices, home cooks, and anyone else who dared to desire it. Even though it is essentially mayonnaise, there are about a million things that can go wrong with it.  Meanwhile, there is only one acceptable way for it to come out. It must be thick, it must be creamy, it must be yellow, it must be SAFE.  It must be a certain temp, not too hot, not too cold, you can almost make it break just by looking at it wrong. On the other hand, Sous Vide Hollandaise is delicious.  Please don’t make me… Modern chefs have devised a number of passive aggressive rationalizations for not using it. It’s too rich, all those yolks, all that butter; too many places use it, so, nobody makes it any more. Anything to avoid admitting that they want it, but they are just so over jumping through hoops trying to get it to come out. Many “quick and easy” methods have been developed to avoid the endless stirring and worrying and watching. Most of these shortcuts either don’t work, or, are just as much trouble as the old way. Lots of dirty dishes, extra bowls, boiling water, whips, not to mention tear soaked Kleenex. You can buy it in a can, or even as a powder, both...

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