Author: Norm King

Lamb Shank Persillé

Rack of Lamb Persillé is a classic dish that features a parsley crust. We’re going to enhance our version by substituting the shank, and by adding a mint pesto. Ingredients: 1 Lamb Shank, 16-24 oz. 1 egg, separated Salt and Pepper, as desired Mint Pesto, enough to coat–approx 2 Tablespoons (see recipe below) Dijon mustard, 2 Tablespoons, enough to coat Fresh Parsley, 1/2 oz. Plain Bread crumbs, 1 cup Mint Pesto Fresh mint leaves, 1 oz fresh garlic, 2 cloves grated parmesan, 1 Tablespoon walnuts, 1 oz salt, pinch EVOO , 1/2 cup Process all ingredients in blender, preferably, or food processor. Blender will make it...

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Sous Vide Indoor BBQ Beef Back Ribs

We’re going to get right down to cooking some BBQ Beef Back Ribs here, but I strongly urge readers to take a look at the article about “syzygizing” Sous Vide and BBQ at some point. Those of you who are skeptical about getting good results from indoor BBQ may at least find it somewhat reassuring, if not completely convincing. Beef Back Ribs.  These things are no bargain.  The butchers know that we desire them, but there is really only a tiny bit of meat on them, unlike pork spare ribs.  That being said, we found some that weren’t too precious,...

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Beef top/inside round, whole: some disassembly required

The round part of the top inside Beef top/inside round is always present in the butcher’s case, but not usually under that name. Working literally from the ground up, as much as a third is commonly used to make hamburger. Unfortunately, the term “ground round” refers to the balance of fat to lean meat and not necessarily the cut being used. This is yet another example of the industry’s efforts to make bovine anatomy as confusing as possible. Top round is used to make stew meat, among many other things. Stew meat is usually labeled specific to size rather...

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Sous Vide Onion Rings, and Why

Ah, the lowly Onion Ring; the humble signature dish of greasy spoons, bowling alleys, and chain restaurants. Such a mundane, mindless dish, barely more than an excuse to eat vast quantities of ketchup. How could Sous Vide possibly improve something so plebeian, so devoid of nuance? How could Sous Vide Onion Rings even work at all? Onion Rings In The Commercial Kitchen I started working in kitchens in the early ’70’s, and Onion Rings had been around for a long time before that. We called them “O-Rings,” for short, bewildering our auto mechanic friends. Unavoidably greasy and messy, hopefully well coated and crispy, the wax...

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Fresh Garlic in Sous Vide

C. botulinum is a spore-forming bacterium. It is common in soil and other everyday substances, including garlic. It is an obligate anaerobe, meaning that oxygen is poisonous to the cells. However, C. botulinum tolerates traces of oxygen due to the enzyme superoxide dismutase, which is an important antioxidant defense in nearly all cells exposed to oxygen. Fresh garlic in Sous Vide sounds like a natural, but it can actually be quite dangerous. C. botulinum is ONLY able to produce the neurotoxin during sporulation, which can ONLY happen in an anaerobic environment, such as being packed in oil. Sporulation is...

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Sous Vide Safety: Shock treatment is not only safe, it is necessary.

There are a number of Facebook groups on sous vide now. Many of them are pretty good places to TALK about sous vide. The one linked HERE is a good place to LEARN about sous vide. Jolt Everybody values delicious, beautiful, perfectly cooked food. But even for restaurants, flavor and appearance of quality are secondary in importance to FOOD SAFETY.  Some people find it “shocking” to discover that no matter how popular your restaurant is, no matter how high the profit margin, no matter how much your family loves you, you will not be popular for long if your food does not meet...

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