The Triple Decker Club.  Our food marketing industry takes so many liberties, creates so many casual and mindless inaccuracies. Many of these oxymoronic misnomers are snatched up and attached to our cultural consciousness, never to be dislodged. There is no such thing as a triple decker club sandwich. Okay, there could be, I could make one, but nobody could wrap their mouth around it.  If a sandwich with three pieces of bread is a triple decker, what does that say about a sandwich with two slices of bread?  Is that a double decker? Have you ever heard a sandwich described as a double decker? Is a single decker an open faced sandwich? I rant, I rail, to little avail.

While we’re at it, what goes on a Club Sandwich?  Back in the days when dinosaurs roamed the plains and ice covered most of the earth, I was taught that a Club sandwich was a BLT stacked on top of a Turkey sandwich. All on toast. It was then cut into four wedges.  Sometimes, they even trimmed the crust. Lettuce, Tomato, and Mayonnaise, because they are part of the definitive model of a cold sandwich.  Or are they? I have seen cheese on Club sandwiches, and ham, and, Heaven help us all, even avocado. We’re gonna pretend like that never happened. Let’s make a sandwich, sort of like a Club.

Ingredients:

  • 5 oz. pork belly, processed @145Fx24 hours.
  • 4 oz. Beef Tri-tip, processed @129Fx12 hours.
  • 3 slices of bread.
  • Mayonnaise, as needed.
  • 8 thin slices tomato.
  • 2 oz. Field Greens, sprinkled with S+P
  • 1 Tablespoon neutral oil
  • 2 oz. Tillamook Medium Cheddar

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  • Okay, first departure.  Instead of bacon, we’re going to use Sous Vide Pork Belly (not cured).
  • This was processed @145Fx24, shocked and refrigerated.  There is an article on the site dedicated to this preparation.

Join Our Club, and Let Freedom Ring

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  • Slice the belly thin, arrange it on a baking pan so they don’t touch.  I used a screen, but that’s not really necessary, Silicone sheets, wax paper, nothing, it all works.  About 5 oz.

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  • Sprinkle with S+P, and toast @350F until it’s rendered out. It won’t get crisp like bacon does, but that’s okay. We’re not duplicating–we’re innovating.
  • Besides, if you bite into a Club sandwich with crisp bacon, it may just fly right out onto your plate–or your lap.

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  • Again, back in the days when we walked to school barefoot in the snow 6 miles uphill, both ways, we used Iceberg lettuce. We thought Iceberg was the ONLY kind of lettuce, so, there was no controversy.  Times have changed, they really have.
  • I used that blend of a few non crisp lettuces, affectionately referred to as Field Greens.  Isn’t Iceberg grown in a field? Let’s not digress.

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  • Field greens are fluffy, which makes them difficult to sandwich-ize.
  • I sprinkle with a little S+P, and…

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  • Just a little smoked paprika oil.  I don’t add acid, be it lemon or vinegar, because that really starts to dissolve the lettuce. Another topic I get worked up about.

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Lettuce Clear Our Minds and Hearts

  • If you put that in a Ziploc Bag, and in the refrigerator, it will be usable through most of the day.
  • If you see it in the fridge tomorrow, let it go, and don’t look back.

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  • I made this sandwich straight through, which I don’t usually do, because of the logistical issues of taking lots of pictures.
  • After 15 minutes or so, the pork belly looks about right.

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  • Meanwhile, I sliced some local tomatoes from from Justy’s,  right down the street. He’s a legend around here.

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  • I sliced some Tillamook Medium Cheddar that was just over $3/lb., I can hang with that.
  • About two ounces.  As thin as possible without altering structural integrity.
  • I gotta get an electric slicer.

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  • Don’t call it leftovers, this is the Tri-tip that we’ve been using for the last few days, about 4 oz..
  • Handled properly, that Tri-tip will keep at least a week after the seal has been broken, much like a carton of milk.  Ah, the joys of Sous Vide Pasteurization!

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  • Don’t try to make a triple decker, or even a double decker, without Frill Picks.
  • There is no shame, there is nothing funny about frill picks.  They can be used for many things.

We Are in Knead of Bread

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  • I made three pieces of toast, in the oven, on the broil position.  This is one of them.

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  • First, the Tri-tip.  It matters.  Crisp things go on the top, soft things on the bottom, as a general principle.  This prevents the knife from getting hung up on something hard down low. It’s logical minutiae.

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  • As per years of badger-like hounding, tomatoes must never touch bread.

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  • The wilted lettuce, as much as you can get on there, squeeze a tight ball, don’t be shy or timid.
  • Then, the next slice of toast (not shown, for some reason), spread on both sides with the mayo of your choice.

Both Sides Now

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  • Then, a flat layer of the crispy/not so crispy pork belly.

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  • The cheese, again, creating layers as flat as possible.
  • Then, four more slices of tomato…

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  • And another application of the marinated greens.

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  • Predictably, another slice of toast.

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  • Note the position of the pics.  If you put them in the corners, you will end up with cubes instead of wedges, and that’s okay, albeit a little bit more difficult.

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  • Cut into four wedges, and arrange so the picks all point in a circle, if that makes sense.

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  • In the middle, French Fries, Chips, Grapes, Potato Salad, whatever you like.  I put some Sous Vide Corn Chowder that I made, tutorial forthcoming.

Now, This is Officially a THING

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  • I gave one wedge to my wife, with a cup of soup, that’s plenty for her.  Ain’t nobody gonna starve here.  I have to eat my work.

So, how many rules did we break?  Pork Belly instead of Bacon.  Rare Beef instead of Turkey (also great Sous Vide, watch for it). Cheese. Wrong kind of lettuce. I thought of calling it “A Club You Could Hit Yourself Over the Head With,” but, I don’t know, maybe too graphic.